Тема: Dr. Seuss bibliography - Wikipedia

Using other people’s research or ideas without giving them due credit is plagiarism. Since BibMe™ makes it easy to create citations, build bibliographies and acknowledge other people’s work, there is no excuse to plagiarize. Don’t be a thief—save your grade, use BibMe™ and give credit to those who deserve it!

2

You can t- a bibliography is a list of websites/books you used to find your information for the project you re working on. soo.lets say I was doing a project on, i don t know, Twilight s author. If I used her website to find things out about her, I would include that, if I used a book, I would use that. (for example): Bibliography Stepheniemeyer.com My Life and Journey by Stephenie Meyer pictures from ___enter site here___ (no such book on Stephenie Meyer exists, but this is just an example, and yes, include the name of the author of the book you took your information from) *note: you also have to put the source of any pictures you have used in your project*

Order essay here Do my bibliography for me

Using other people’s research or ideas without giving them due credit is plagiarism. Since BibMe™ makes it easy to create citations, build bibliographies and acknowledge other people’s work, there is no excuse to plagiarize. Don’t be a thief—save your grade, use BibMe™ and give credit to those who deserve it!

4

The website is the bibliography. If you used that as one of your sources or at least retrieved some information. :]

Shanna s answer is basically right: You come up with a list of sources, just like you might do for any research paper. However, you write a short paragraph under each citation, discussing what the source says and how it relates to the sort of research question you were pursuing. I can point you to some sites and examples. 1. For a first stop, you might look at the Online Writing Lab at Purdue University. Click the first source link I ve provided below. This site is from a university writing program, and is a pretty solid guide. There s a short example, showing you what an annotated citation should look like. Pay attention to the indenting -- it seems like a technicality, but if you don t do the indenting right, the annotated bibliography becomes unreadable. 2. For another example of a full list, you could take a look at one I created. If you click on the second site I listed below, scroll down to the section called "Step 3: The Source List." That section is one giant annotated bibliography. I include this example because it shows you what a full list on a specific topic looks like. It also shows how much flexibility there is in this format. 3. Now for an odd tip. The last few novels by Michael Crichton (like State of Fear) have annotated bibliographies in them, in which he comments on the research he did for the novels. I know you might not have a copy of his novels lying around, but if you can find a copy of one, it ll help you see *why* someone writes such a thing: You can tell what his goal is. It s not just a list. He s making some points. Writing a list with that sort of focus is more likely to make an impression on your instructor than a random assortment of source summaries will. (I say this as a college-level writing instructor. A list that is driven by clear goals is better than a random one.) One final comment: You ll notice if you look at several lists (such as the ones above) that each one comments on different sorts of things. The Purdue example is more like the sort of thing you ought to be doing. My example includes comments about how the sources might be useful to students. Crichton s comments talk about the significance of each source to the argument he is trying to make. Annotated bibliographies can do all of these things. Good luck!