Тема: Dr. Laura Call of the Day

CPM Educational Program is a California nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation dedicated to improving grades 6-12 mathematics instruction. CPM’s mission is to empower.

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CPM Educational Program is a California nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation dedicated to improving grades 6-12 mathematics instruction. CPM’s mission is to empower.

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math is all about practice, and usually a lot more time than you thought would be required. you do the problems over and over until you can get the correct answer without making any missteps. most math texts give answers for at least some of the exercises. start with those. if your math book doesn t give answers, use one of those free math solver sites. They don t give steps, and you have to be careful because all of them fail at certain kinds of problems (and it s different from site to site). ♣♦

Doing homework can be both time-consuming and frustrating, and life is more than just homework. Here are some steps you might like to try using to get your homework done well, efficiently and without distractions. It is also important that you pay attention in class and ask plenty of questions so you know exactly what your homework assignment actually consists of! Get started at step one below

Everyone learns in their own way. I can only say what worked for me. I don t know what level of math you are attempting, but it sounds like it might be pre-algebra or algebra I. Math is all procedural technique. Each step is simple in itself, but it takes some skill to recognize which steps are required, in what order, and then to reliably apply the required operation. There are many opportunities for mistakes, and small errors render your efforts useless. Skill development requires practice, otherwise it s like trying to learn to catch a ball based on instruction alone. Practice might mean a few hours a day, everyday. What is a "step?" It may be smaller than you think.You should be able to "see" instantly that each step is correct. If you have to wonder too long, you cannot be confident in your answer. Forget about what other people do or show: when you are learning take tiny, tiny steps. In a typical math text book, answers are provided for at least some of the exercises. Take a pencil and a sheet of paper. Work the exercise. Check you answer. If it is right, do the next. If it is wrong, check your steps, find an error, then do the same problem again from the beginning with a blank sheet (or space). On the internet, there are many math "solver" sites that will give you an answer for any problem. Some sites are better than others (and most can be relied on to fail at the really difficult problems). Try http://www.quickmath.com/ (I don t recommend its sponsor, Algebra Solver or Algebrator). If there is a type of problem giving you trouble, make up variations and work them until you get them down. Beyond that, there are a few things you should simply memorize: Obviously addition and multiplication tables up to at least 13; perfect squares beyond 169 up to at least 625; perfect cubes up to 15625 (25³); and finally the first few irrational square and cube roots (to 3 or 4 decimal points). Try flash cards. Expect to struggle for a while, then one day, quite unexpectedly, you will get the "light bulb" moment, and ever after wonder why you used to think math was hard.

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Doing homework can be both time-consuming and frustrating, and life is more than just homework. Here are some steps you might like to try using to get your homework done well, efficiently and without distractions. It is also important that you pay attention in class and ask plenty of questions so you know exactly what your homework assignment actually consists of! Get started at step one below

CPM Educational Program is a California nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation dedicated to improving grades 6-12 mathematics instruction.

CPM’s mission is to empower mathematics students and teachers through exemplary curriculum, professional development, and leadership. We recognize and foster teacher expertise and leadership in mathematics education. We engage all students in learning mathematics through problem solving, reasoning, and communication.