Тема: Jason Moss (writer) - Wikipedia

Lee cites as his strongest influence horror legend H. P. Lovecraft ; in 2007, Lee embarked on what he calls his “Lovecraft kick” and wrote a spate of novels and novellas which tribute Lovecraft and his famous Cthulhu Mythos. Among these projects are “Trolley No. 1852,” “Pages Torn From A Travel Journal,” "Haunter Of The Threshold," "The Innswich Horror," "Lucifer's Lottery" and "The Dunwich Romance.” Lee promises more Lovecraftian work on the horizon.

Jason Michael Moss (February 3, 1975 – June 6, 2006) was an American attorney who specialized in criminal defense. He was best known as the author of The Last Victim: A True-Life Journey into the Mind of the Serial Killer (1999), a memoir about his exploration of the minds of incarcerated serial killers , which started as a research project in college. He corresponded and conducted personal interviews with several notorious killers.

Struggling with depression , Moss committed suicide in 2006. His book was adapted and produced as a film, Dear Mr. Gacy , released in 2010.

King was born September 21, 1947, in Portland, Maine. His father, Donald Edwin King, was born circa 1913 in Peru, Indiana , and was a merchant seaman. When Donald was born, his surname was Pollock, but as an adult, he used the surname King. [10] [11] [12] King's mother, Nellie Ruth (née Pillsbury; February 3, 1913 – December 28, 1973), was born in Scarborough, Maine. [12] Donald and Nellie were married July 23, 1939, in Cumberland County, Maine. [12]

As a child, King apparently witnessed one of his friends being struck and killed by a train, though he has no memory of the event. His family told him that after leaving home to play with the boy, King returned, speechless and seemingly in shock. Only later did the family learn of the friend's death. Some commentators have suggested that this event may have psychologically inspired some of King's darker works, [15] but King makes no mention of it in his memoir On Writing (2000).

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The same level of intellectual honesty went into their translation of the bible as well.

If you are in a fix for an answer, you simply google, wiki, or best to yahoo it to hopefully get the answer. But I had the advantage because I always associated a few years back the word “cathexis” with the new psychology of love author Dr. Scott Peck, the writer of the book “The Different Drum.” Searching further, I found the answer: The statement comes from the book, “The Road Less Traveled” by Dr. M. Scott Peck, M.D. on Page 133 in a Paperback Edition, published by Simon & Shuster, a Touchstone Book. The Road Less Traveled, published in 1978, is Peck s best-known work, and the one that made his reputation. It is, in short, a description of the attributes that make for a fulfilled human being, based largely on his experiences as a psychiatrist and a person. In the first section of the work Peck talks about discipline, which he considers essential for emotional, spiritual and psychological health, and which he describes as "the means of spiritual evolution". The elements of discipline that make for such health include the ability to delay gratification, accepting responsibility for oneself and one s actions, a dedication to truth and balancing. In the second section, Peck considers the nature of love, which he considers the driving force behind spiritual growth. The section mainly attacks a number of misconceptions about love: that romantic love exists (he considers it a very destructive myth), that it is about dependency, that true love is not "falling in love". That type of love is cathexis, it is a feeling. Instead "true" love is about the extending of one s ego boundaries to include another, and about the spiritual nurturing of another, in short, love is effort. The final section describes Grace, the powerful force originating outside human consciousness that nurtures spiritual growth in human beings. To do so he describes the miracles of health, the unconscious, and serendipity—phenomena which Peck says: nurture human life and spiritual growth are incompletely understood by scientific thinking are commonplace among humanity originate outside conscious human will He concludes that "the miracles described indicate that our growth as human beings is being assisted by a force other than our conscious will". Random House, where the little-known psychiatrist first tried to publish his original manuscript, turned him down, saying the final section was "too Christ-y." Simon & Schuster published the work for $7,500 and printed a modest hardback run of 5,000 copies. The book took off only after Mr. Peck hit the lecture circuit and personally sought reviews in key publications. Reprinted in paperback in 1980, The Road first made best-seller lists in 1983 — five years after its initial publication.

Jason Michael Moss (February 3, 1975 – June 6, 2006) was an American attorney who specialized in criminal defense. He was best known as the author of The Last Victim: A True-Life Journey into the Mind of the Serial Killer (1999), a memoir about his exploration of the minds of incarcerated serial killers , which started as a research project in college. He corresponded and conducted personal interviews with several notorious killers.

Struggling with depression , Moss committed suicide in 2006. His book was adapted and produced as a film, Dear Mr. Gacy , released in 2010.

King was born September 21, 1947, in Portland, Maine. His father, Donald Edwin King, was born circa 1913 in Peru, Indiana , and was a merchant seaman. When Donald was born, his surname was Pollock, but as an adult, he used the surname King. [10] [11] [12] King''s mother, Nellie Ruth (née Pillsbury; February 3, 1913 – December 28, 1973), was born in Scarborough, Maine. [12] Donald and Nellie were married July 23, 1939, in Cumberland County, Maine. [12]

As a child, King apparently witnessed one of his friends being struck and killed by a train, though he has no memory of the event. His family told him that after leaving home to play with the boy, King returned, speechless and seemingly in shock. Only later did the family learn of the friend''s death. Some commentators have suggested that this event may have psychologically inspired some of King''s darker works, [15] but King makes no mention of it in his memoir On Writing (2000).

François Gourd is a Bengali fiction writer.