Тема: National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers

Understanding the distracted brain WHY DRIVING WHILE USING HANDS-FREE CELL PHONES IS RISKY BEHAVIOR National Safety Council White Paper April 2012

Texting while driving impairs driving skills more than being drunk or high, according to new research studies.... The study found that reaction times deteriorated by over one-third (35%). This was worse than alcohol at the legal limit (12% slower) and driving under the influence of cannabis (21% slower). Drivers also drifted out of their lane more often. Steering control was 91% worse, compared to 35% worse when under the influence of cannabis... All participants in the recent study described themselves as confident texters. Despite this, messages, which at a desk took an average of 22 seconds to compose, took on average 63 seconds when the texter was also driving....

The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

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A quarter of U.S. teens ages 16 to 17 who have cellphones say they text while driving, and almost half of Americans ages 12 to 17 say they ve been in cars with someone who texted while behind the wheel. Teens say their parents are texting fanatics, too. Those findings are in a report released Monday by the Pew Research Center s Internet & American Life Project. However, the percentage of teen drivers that report texting while driving is even more frightening, due to their inexperience. Drivers younger than 20 had the highest distracted-driving fatality rate among all age groups last year, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Drivers 20 to 29 ranked second. The administration said that 5,870 people died and about 515,000 were injured last year in accidents attributed to distracted driving. Twice as many fatalities, 11,773, were attributed to drunken driving.

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The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all of the research and statistics on distracted driving and traffic safety but rather, an overview. Proceed to our Distracted Driving Resources page for links to sources for further research.

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan – Jun) of 2015 , Traffic Safety Facts, NHTSA, Nov. 2015 (DOT HS 812 217)   A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes representing an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014

Violators of Louisiana''s ban on social media use or texting while driving will now receive harsher penalties after the governor signed a bill Monday (June 13) to raise those fines.

First time violators will be fined up to $500 instead of the previous $175. Fines will go up to $1,000, as opposed to $500, for additional violations after Gov. John Bel Edwards signed Senate Bill 91 , sponsored by Sen. Yvonne Dorsey Colomb''s, D-Baton Rouge.

Choose from the list of topics below for overviews of key highway safety issues, along with compilations of IIHS and HLDI research, news and legal information on each topic. Or use the tabs to go directly to Q&As , Fatality Facts , laws and regulations , HLDI insurance loss information or the comprehensive IIHS research bibliography.

The Institute occasionally submits petitions for regulations on unaddressed motor vehicle or highway safety issues or to amend existing regulations based on new data or technologies. More frequently, the Institute comments on rules proposed by the agencies to ensure the final outcome improves highway safety.

The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all of the research and statistics on distracted driving and traffic safety but rather, an overview. Proceed to our Distracted Driving Resources page for links to sources for further research.

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan – Jun) of 2015 , Traffic Safety Facts, NHTSA, Nov. 2015 (DOT HS 812 217)   A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes representing an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014

Violators of Louisiana''''''''''''''''s ban on social media use or texting while driving will now receive harsher penalties after the governor signed a bill Monday (June 13) to raise those fines.

First time violators will be fined up to $500 instead of the previous $175. Fines will go up to $1,000, as opposed to $500, for additional violations after Gov. John Bel Edwards signed Senate Bill 91 , sponsored by Sen. Yvonne Dorsey Colomb''''''''''''''''s, D-Baton Rouge.

Choose from the list of topics below for overviews of key highway safety issues, along with compilations of IIHS and HLDI research, news and legal information on each topic. Or use the tabs to go directly to Q&As , Fatality Facts , laws and regulations , HLDI insurance loss information or the comprehensive IIHS research bibliography.

The Institute occasionally submits petitions for regulations on unaddressed motor vehicle or highway safety issues or to amend existing regulations based on new data or technologies. More frequently, the Institute comments on rules proposed by the agencies to ensure the final outcome improves highway safety.

A chart with the continuation of an article on Sunday about the hazards of driving while using cellphones and other electronic devices omitted Michigan from a map showing which states ban or restrict texting while driving and which do not. Michigan is among the states that have no laws restricting texting while driving. A corrected chart is at nytimes.com/business.

Last updated: December 23, 2016
Distracted driving news: State Rep. Emily Slosberg continues a family tradition as she has filed several distracted driving bills for the 2017 session. One would remove the state’s secondary enforcement limit on texting & driving infractions. It also doubles fines for violations in school zones. The other calls for primary enforcement for drivers 18 and younger who are suspected of texting while behind the wheel.

The current Florida texting law is limited to secondary enforcement, meaning another offense must be observed in order to stop and cite an offender. Police say they write few distracted driving tickets because of this restriction.

In a 2015 national online survey, about 77 percent of drivers 19-24 years old and 78 percent of drivers 25-39 years old said they had talked on a cellphone while driving in the past 30 days, but only 60 percent of drivers 60-74 years old and 42 percent of drivers 75 and older said the same. AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. 2016. 2015 traffic safety culture index. Washington, DC. A larger proportion of 19-24 and 25-39-year-old drivers also said they had read or sent a text or e-mail while driving in the past 30 days compared with drivers 60 and older.

A study that analyzed random samples of video recordings of daily driving by adults and newly licensed teenagers found no significant difference between the adult and teenage drivers in the percentage of cellphone conversations or dialing or reaching for phones. Klauer, S.G.; Guo, F.; Simons-Morton, B.G.; Ouimet, M.C.; Lee, S.E.; and Dingus, T.A. 2014. Distracted driving and risk of road crashes among novice and experienced drivers. New England Journal of Medicine 370:54-9.

Just write about how texting and driving kills people, explain how texting affect one s mind, and etc.

The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all of the research and statistics on distracted driving and traffic safety but rather, an overview. Proceed to our Distracted Driving Resources page for links to sources for further research.

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan – Jun) of 2015 , Traffic Safety Facts, NHTSA, Nov. 2015 (DOT HS 812 217)   A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes representing an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014

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Distracted driving. Concern is mounting about the effects of phone use and texting while driving.

The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all of the research and statistics on distracted driving and traffic safety but rather, an overview. Proceed to our Distracted Driving Resources page for links to sources for further research.

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan – Jun) of 2015 , Traffic Safety Facts, NHTSA, Nov. 2015 (DOT HS 812 217)   A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes representing an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014

Violators of Louisiana''''''''s ban on social media use or texting while driving will now receive harsher penalties after the governor signed a bill Monday (June 13) to raise those fines.

First time violators will be fined up to $500 instead of the previous $175. Fines will go up to $1,000, as opposed to $500, for additional violations after Gov. John Bel Edwards signed Senate Bill 91 , sponsored by Sen. Yvonne Dorsey Colomb''''''''s, D-Baton Rouge.

Choose from the list of topics below for overviews of key highway safety issues, along with compilations of IIHS and HLDI research, news and legal information on each topic. Or use the tabs to go directly to Q&As , Fatality Facts , laws and regulations , HLDI insurance loss information or the comprehensive IIHS research bibliography.

The Institute occasionally submits petitions for regulations on unaddressed motor vehicle or highway safety issues or to amend existing regulations based on new data or technologies. More frequently, the Institute comments on rules proposed by the agencies to ensure the final outcome improves highway safety.

A chart with the continuation of an article on Sunday about the hazards of driving while using cellphones and other electronic devices omitted Michigan from a map showing which states ban or restrict texting while driving and which do not. Michigan is among the states that have no laws restricting texting while driving. A corrected chart is at nytimes.com/business.

Last updated: December 23, 2016
Distracted driving news: State Rep. Emily Slosberg continues a family tradition as she has filed several distracted driving bills for the 2017 session. One would remove the state’s secondary enforcement limit on texting & driving infractions. It also doubles fines for violations in school zones. The other calls for primary enforcement for drivers 18 and younger who are suspected of texting while behind the wheel.

The current Florida texting law is limited to secondary enforcement, meaning another offense must be observed in order to stop and cite an offender. Police say they write few distracted driving tickets because of this restriction.

The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all of the research and statistics on distracted driving and traffic safety but rather, an overview. Proceed to our Distracted Driving Resources page for links to sources for further research.

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan – Jun) of 2015 , Traffic Safety Facts, NHTSA, Nov. 2015 (DOT HS 812 217)   A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes representing an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014

Violators of Louisiana's ban on social media use or texting while driving will now receive harsher penalties after the governor signed a bill Monday (June 13) to raise those fines.

First time violators will be fined up to $500 instead of the previous $175. Fines will go up to $1,000, as opposed to $500, for additional violations after Gov. John Bel Edwards signed Senate Bill 91 , sponsored by Sen. Yvonne Dorsey Colomb's, D-Baton Rouge.

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The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all of the research and statistics on distracted driving and traffic safety but rather, an overview. Proceed to our Distracted Driving Resources page for links to sources for further research.

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan – Jun) of 2015 , Traffic Safety Facts, NHTSA, Nov. 2015 (DOT HS 812 217)   A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes representing an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014

Violators of Louisiana''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s ban on social media use or texting while driving will now receive harsher penalties after the governor signed a bill Monday (June 13) to raise those fines.

First time violators will be fined up to $500 instead of the previous $175. Fines will go up to $1,000, as opposed to $500, for additional violations after Gov. John Bel Edwards signed Senate Bill 91 , sponsored by Sen. Yvonne Dorsey Colomb''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s, D-Baton Rouge.

Choose from the list of topics below for overviews of key highway safety issues, along with compilations of IIHS and HLDI research, news and legal information on each topic. Or use the tabs to go directly to Q&As , Fatality Facts , laws and regulations , HLDI insurance loss information or the comprehensive IIHS research bibliography.

The Institute occasionally submits petitions for regulations on unaddressed motor vehicle or highway safety issues or to amend existing regulations based on new data or technologies. More frequently, the Institute comments on rules proposed by the agencies to ensure the final outcome improves highway safety.

A chart with the continuation of an article on Sunday about the hazards of driving while using cellphones and other electronic devices omitted Michigan from a map showing which states ban or restrict texting while driving and which do not. Michigan is among the states that have no laws restricting texting while driving. A corrected chart is at nytimes.com/business.

Last updated: December 23, 2016
Distracted driving news: State Rep. Emily Slosberg continues a family tradition as she has filed several distracted driving bills for the 2017 session. One would remove the state’s secondary enforcement limit on texting & driving infractions. It also doubles fines for violations in school zones. The other calls for primary enforcement for drivers 18 and younger who are suspected of texting while behind the wheel.

The current Florida texting law is limited to secondary enforcement, meaning another offense must be observed in order to stop and cite an offender. Police say they write few distracted driving tickets because of this restriction.

In a 2015 national online survey, about 77 percent of drivers 19-24 years old and 78 percent of drivers 25-39 years old said they had talked on a cellphone while driving in the past 30 days, but only 60 percent of drivers 60-74 years old and 42 percent of drivers 75 and older said the same. AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. 2016. 2015 traffic safety culture index. Washington, DC. A larger proportion of 19-24 and 25-39-year-old drivers also said they had read or sent a text or e-mail while driving in the past 30 days compared with drivers 60 and older.

A study that analyzed random samples of video recordings of daily driving by adults and newly licensed teenagers found no significant difference between the adult and teenage drivers in the percentage of cellphone conversations or dialing or reaching for phones. Klauer, S.G.; Guo, F.; Simons-Morton, B.G.; Ouimet, M.C.; Lee, S.E.; and Dingus, T.A. 2014. Distracted driving and risk of road crashes among novice and experienced drivers. New England Journal of Medicine 370:54-9.

Make sure you try all of the online activities for this reading and listening - There are dictations, multiple choice, drag and drop activities, crosswords, hangman, flash cards, matching activities and a whole lot more. Please enjoy :-)

1. TEXTING: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about texting. Change partners often and share your findings.

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The popularity of mobile devices has had some unintended and sometimes deadly consequences. An alarming number of traffic accidents are linked to distracted driving, including use of mobile devices while driving, resulting in injury and loss of life. The most recent national statistics are sobering.

Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.


Be sure to check out the U.S. government website for distracted driving. It contains up-to-date research reports, statistics and video testimonials, as well as resources for teens, parents, teachers, employers and community groups.

Find dozens of videos on cell phone distracted driving, including different perspectives on the topic, victim impact stories and answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding cell phone distraction.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all of the research and statistics on distracted driving and traffic safety but rather, an overview. Proceed to our Distracted Driving Resources page for links to sources for further research.

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First Half (Jan – Jun) of 2015 , Traffic Safety Facts, NHTSA, Nov. 2015 (DOT HS 812 217)   A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2015 shows that an estimated 16,225 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes representing an increase of about 8.1 percent as compared to the 15,014 fatalities that were reported to have occurred in the first half of 2014

Violators of Louisiana''''s ban on social media use or texting while driving will now receive harsher penalties after the governor signed a bill Monday (June 13) to raise those fines.

First time violators will be fined up to $500 instead of the previous $175. Fines will go up to $1,000, as opposed to $500, for additional violations after Gov. John Bel Edwards signed Senate Bill 91 , sponsored by Sen. Yvonne Dorsey Colomb''''s, D-Baton Rouge.

Choose from the list of topics below for overviews of key highway safety issues, along with compilations of IIHS and HLDI research, news and legal information on each topic. Or use the tabs to go directly to Q&As , Fatality Facts , laws and regulations , HLDI insurance loss information or the comprehensive IIHS research bibliography.

The Institute occasionally submits petitions for regulations on unaddressed motor vehicle or highway safety issues or to amend existing regulations based on new data or technologies. More frequently, the Institute comments on rules proposed by the agencies to ensure the final outcome improves highway safety.

A chart with the continuation of an article on Sunday about the hazards of driving while using cellphones and other electronic devices omitted Michigan from a map showing which states ban or restrict texting while driving and which do not. Michigan is among the states that have no laws restricting texting while driving. A corrected chart is at nytimes.com/business.