Тема: allegory of a cave purpose?

The allegory of all allegories, Plato's Allegory of the Cave is not the rosiest take on the reality of human existence. You might even call it downright bleak: it envisions the world as a dark cave, human beings as trapped prisoners, and all of our experiences as nothing but shadows on a wall. "See human beings as though they were in an underground cave-like dwelling," instructs Socrates, "with its entrance, a long one, open to the light across the whole width of the cave" (514a).

Imagine a cave with a small tunnel of light leading out and hundreds of human beings tied up so that they can't move—they just stare straight ahead all day long (creepy, we know). But they do get a little entertainment: there's a rockin' shadow-puppet show projected on the wall in front of them with a fire burning in the back for light. Since this show is all these poor people can see, they think it's the best, most awesome reality ever. They chat about it, gossip, call people names. you know, the usual.

The "Cave" of Plato.. Is still a brilliant and lucid analogy of the state of (un)awareness of most of humanity. If I were to present it in present day context, it might be something like this: Folks sit around the TV/computer/phone screen immersed in what they think is something like reality. While in fact all the while reality is going on all around them. And, all this including the TV/computer/phone, is being projected by their own minds on the screen of awareness. So a kind of double reflection coming from the electronic media, creating even more illusion. Look to who or what, is actually seeing.

The allegory of all allegories, Plato''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Allegory of the Cave is not the rosiest take on the reality of human existence. You might even call it downright bleak: it envisions the world as a dark cave, human beings as trapped prisoners, and all of our experiences as nothing but shadows on a wall. "See human beings as though they were in an underground cave-like dwelling," instructs Socrates, "with its entrance, a long one, open to the light across the whole width of the cave" (514a).

Imagine a cave with a small tunnel of light leading out and hundreds of human beings tied up so that they can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t move—they just stare straight ahead all day long (creepy, we know). But they do get a little entertainment: there''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a rockin'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' shadow-puppet show projected on the wall in front of them with a fire burning in the back for light. Since this show is all these poor people can see, they think it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s the best, most awesome reality ever. They chat about it, gossip, call people names. you know, the usual.

In allegorical writing characters, actions and setting are used as symbols and they should be interpreted to make the allegorical meaning. In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato has given a description of the cave of the cave world.

The cave is very dark because there is little light inside it and hardly seen the objects. There are some chained people on their necks as well as feet, these chained people cannot move easily. Similarly, there is also another world out of the cave world, but between these two worlds, a wall is raised. On the wall, many other people move with different things on their hands and their shadows fall in the cave world. The people inside the cave cannot raise their head completely so that they can only see the shadows like illusion, which they believe, as real but it is just their illusion.

“The Matrix”, like Plato’s The Cave, engages the reader in a fictional world that also connects with our own world, causing us to critically analyze our perceptions of reality.  “The Matrix” modernizes the original allegory and ads human dilemma, emotions and intense fight scenes to connect the ancient philosophy to a rapidly evolving world.

“The Matrix.”  Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 13 Feb. 2012.

In Book VII, Socrates presents the most beautiful and famous metaphor in Western philosophy: the allegory of the cave. This metaphor is meant to illustrate the effects of education on the human soul. Education moves the philosopher through the stages on the divided line, and ultimately brings him to the Form of the Good.

Next, this prisoner is dragged out of the cave into the world above. At first, he is so dazzled by the light up there that he can only look at shadows, then at reflections, then finally at the real objects real trees, flowers, houses and so on. He sees that these are even more real than the statues were, and that those were only copies of these. He has now reached the cognitive stage of thought. He has caught his first glimpse of the most real things, the Forms.

Humanity is lost, gazing at shadows thrown indirectly on the wall and trying to interpret them instead of leaving the cave and experiencing reality directly.

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read it--google it

The allegory of all allegories, Plato''''''''''''''''s Allegory of the Cave is not the rosiest take on the reality of human existence. You might even call it downright bleak: it envisions the world as a dark cave, human beings as trapped prisoners, and all of our experiences as nothing but shadows on a wall. "See human beings as though they were in an underground cave-like dwelling," instructs Socrates, "with its entrance, a long one, open to the light across the whole width of the cave" (514a).

Imagine a cave with a small tunnel of light leading out and hundreds of human beings tied up so that they can''''''''''''''''t move—they just stare straight ahead all day long (creepy, we know). But they do get a little entertainment: there''''''''''''''''s a rockin'''''''''''''''' shadow-puppet show projected on the wall in front of them with a fire burning in the back for light. Since this show is all these poor people can see, they think it''''''''''''''''s the best, most awesome reality ever. They chat about it, gossip, call people names. you know, the usual.

In allegorical writing characters, actions and setting are used as symbols and they should be interpreted to make the allegorical meaning. In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato has given a description of the cave of the cave world.

The cave is very dark because there is little light inside it and hardly seen the objects. There are some chained people on their necks as well as feet, these chained people cannot move easily. Similarly, there is also another world out of the cave world, but between these two worlds, a wall is raised. On the wall, many other people move with different things on their hands and their shadows fall in the cave world. The people inside the cave cannot raise their head completely so that they can only see the shadows like illusion, which they believe, as real but it is just their illusion.

“The Matrix”, like Plato’s The Cave, engages the reader in a fictional world that also connects with our own world, causing us to critically analyze our perceptions of reality.  “The Matrix” modernizes the original allegory and ads human dilemma, emotions and intense fight scenes to connect the ancient philosophy to a rapidly evolving world.

“The Matrix.”  Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 13 Feb. 2012.

The allegory of all allegories, Plato''''''''s Allegory of the Cave is not the rosiest take on the reality of human existence. You might even call it downright bleak: it envisions the world as a dark cave, human beings as trapped prisoners, and all of our experiences as nothing but shadows on a wall. "See human beings as though they were in an underground cave-like dwelling," instructs Socrates, "with its entrance, a long one, open to the light across the whole width of the cave" (514a).

Imagine a cave with a small tunnel of light leading out and hundreds of human beings tied up so that they can''''''''t move—they just stare straight ahead all day long (creepy, we know). But they do get a little entertainment: there''''''''s a rockin'''''''' shadow-puppet show projected on the wall in front of them with a fire burning in the back for light. Since this show is all these poor people can see, they think it''''''''s the best, most awesome reality ever. They chat about it, gossip, call people names. you know, the usual.

In allegorical writing characters, actions and setting are used as symbols and they should be interpreted to make the allegorical meaning. In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato has given a description of the cave of the cave world.

The cave is very dark because there is little light inside it and hardly seen the objects. There are some chained people on their necks as well as feet, these chained people cannot move easily. Similarly, there is also another world out of the cave world, but between these two worlds, a wall is raised. On the wall, many other people move with different things on their hands and their shadows fall in the cave world. The people inside the cave cannot raise their head completely so that they can only see the shadows like illusion, which they believe, as real but it is just their illusion.

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Free Allegory of the Cave papers, essays, and research papers.

The allegory of all allegories, Plato''s Allegory of the Cave is not the rosiest take on the reality of human existence. You might even call it downright bleak: it envisions the world as a dark cave, human beings as trapped prisoners, and all of our experiences as nothing but shadows on a wall. "See human beings as though they were in an underground cave-like dwelling," instructs Socrates, "with its entrance, a long one, open to the light across the whole width of the cave" (514a).

Imagine a cave with a small tunnel of light leading out and hundreds of human beings tied up so that they can''t move—they just stare straight ahead all day long (creepy, we know). But they do get a little entertainment: there''s a rockin'' shadow-puppet show projected on the wall in front of them with a fire burning in the back for light. Since this show is all these poor people can see, they think it''s the best, most awesome reality ever. They chat about it, gossip, call people names. you know, the usual.

10

The allegory of all allegories, Plato''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Allegory of the Cave is not the rosiest take on the reality of human existence. You might even call it downright bleak: it envisions the world as a dark cave, human beings as trapped prisoners, and all of our experiences as nothing but shadows on a wall. "See human beings as though they were in an underground cave-like dwelling," instructs Socrates, "with its entrance, a long one, open to the light across the whole width of the cave" (514a).

Imagine a cave with a small tunnel of light leading out and hundreds of human beings tied up so that they can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t move—they just stare straight ahead all day long (creepy, we know). But they do get a little entertainment: there''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a rockin'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' shadow-puppet show projected on the wall in front of them with a fire burning in the back for light. Since this show is all these poor people can see, they think it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s the best, most awesome reality ever. They chat about it, gossip, call people names. you know, the usual.

In allegorical writing characters, actions and setting are used as symbols and they should be interpreted to make the allegorical meaning. In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato has given a description of the cave of the cave world.

The cave is very dark because there is little light inside it and hardly seen the objects. There are some chained people on their necks as well as feet, these chained people cannot move easily. Similarly, there is also another world out of the cave world, but between these two worlds, a wall is raised. On the wall, many other people move with different things on their hands and their shadows fall in the cave world. The people inside the cave cannot raise their head completely so that they can only see the shadows like illusion, which they believe, as real but it is just their illusion.

“The Matrix”, like Plato’s The Cave, engages the reader in a fictional world that also connects with our own world, causing us to critically analyze our perceptions of reality.  “The Matrix” modernizes the original allegory and ads human dilemma, emotions and intense fight scenes to connect the ancient philosophy to a rapidly evolving world.

“The Matrix.”  Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 13 Feb. 2012.

In Book VII, Socrates presents the most beautiful and famous metaphor in Western philosophy: the allegory of the cave. This metaphor is meant to illustrate the effects of education on the human soul. Education moves the philosopher through the stages on the divided line, and ultimately brings him to the Form of the Good.

Next, this prisoner is dragged out of the cave into the world above. At first, he is so dazzled by the light up there that he can only look at shadows, then at reflections, then finally at the real objects real trees, flowers, houses and so on. He sees that these are even more real than the statues were, and that those were only copies of these. He has now reached the cognitive stage of thought. He has caught his first glimpse of the most real things, the Forms.

The allegory of all allegories, Plato''''s Allegory of the Cave is not the rosiest take on the reality of human existence. You might even call it downright bleak: it envisions the world as a dark cave, human beings as trapped prisoners, and all of our experiences as nothing but shadows on a wall. "See human beings as though they were in an underground cave-like dwelling," instructs Socrates, "with its entrance, a long one, open to the light across the whole width of the cave" (514a).

Imagine a cave with a small tunnel of light leading out and hundreds of human beings tied up so that they can''''t move—they just stare straight ahead all day long (creepy, we know). But they do get a little entertainment: there''''s a rockin'''' shadow-puppet show projected on the wall in front of them with a fire burning in the back for light. Since this show is all these poor people can see, they think it''''s the best, most awesome reality ever. They chat about it, gossip, call people names. you know, the usual.

In allegorical writing characters, actions and setting are used as symbols and they should be interpreted to make the allegorical meaning. In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato has given a description of the cave of the cave world.

The cave is very dark because there is little light inside it and hardly seen the objects. There are some chained people on their necks as well as feet, these chained people cannot move easily. Similarly, there is also another world out of the cave world, but between these two worlds, a wall is raised. On the wall, many other people move with different things on their hands and their shadows fall in the cave world. The people inside the cave cannot raise their head completely so that they can only see the shadows like illusion, which they believe, as real but it is just their illusion.