Тема: The Basics of Creative Problem Solving – CPS | Innovation.

This article explains a wide range of techniques that helps you develop creative solutions to your problems.

We encourage you to use the content you find on this site, in accordance with the Creative Commons license specified here, and on each page:

Click the image above for a description of these terms. For additional permissions (e.g., to license the work for commercial use), e-mail us.

It’s a process that helps you redefine the problems and opportunities you face, come  up with new, innovative responses and solutions, and then take action. The tools and techniques used make the process fun, engaging, and collaborative. CPS not only helps you create better solutions, it creates a positive experience that helps speed the  adoption of new ideas.

If you search the Internet for “Creative Problem Solving,” you’ll find evidence of many variations, all of which may be traced back to the work that was started by Alex Osborn in the 1940s, developed with Sid Parnes in the 1950s, and nurtured at SUNY Buffalo State and the Creative Education Foundation.

Early interest in the creative process examined the natural approaches taken by highly creative people in applying their personal creativity when solving problems (e.g., Crawford, 1937; Dewey, 1910; Ghiselin, 1950; Poincaré, 1924; Spearman, 1931; Wallas, 1926). The effort to make these creative processes more visible, explicit, and deliberate has been one of the most formidable challenges for researchers for many years.

Basadur, M. S., Graen, G. B. & Green, S. G. (1982). Training in creative problem solving: Effects on ideation and problem finding in an industrial research organization. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 30 , 41-70.

Creative ideas do not suddenly appear in people’s minds for no apparent reason. Rather, they are the result of trying to solve a specific problem or to achieve a particular goal. Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity were not sudden inspirations. Rather they were the result of a huge amount of mental problem solving trying to close a discrepancy between the laws of physics and the laws of electromagnetism as they were understood at the time.

Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison and other creative geniuses have always worked in the same way. They do not wait for creative ideas to strike them. Rather they focus on trying to solve a clearly stated, at least in their minds, problem.

Imagine that you''''''''re vacuuming your house in a hurry because you''''''''ve got friends coming over. Frustratingly, you''''''''re working hard but you''''''''re not getting very far. You kneel down, open up the vacuum cleaner, and pull out the bag. In a cloud of dust, you realize that it''''''''s full. again. Coughing, you empty it and wonder why vacuum cleaners with bags still exist!

James Dyson , inventor and founder of Dyson® vacuum cleaners, had exactly the same problem, and he used creative problem solving to find the answer. While many companies focused on developing a better vacuum cleaner filter, he realized that he had to think differently and find a more creative solution. So, he devised a revolutionary way to separate the dirt from the air, and invented the world''''''''s first bagless vacuum cleaner.

Creative problem solving is a technique to approach a problem or address a challenge in an imaginative way; it helps us flex our minds, find path-breaking ideas and take suitable actions thereafter.

While creative problem solving is a structured approach, it gives users the flexibility to use it in innumerable ways for different kinds of situations. One classic example that demonstrates creative problem solving is the story of the Wright Brothers, who despite their several failures, learnt from their mistakes and overcame the challenges of wing shape and warping to make flying possible. They didn’t give up easily; instead they put in a lot of time into studying the problem and experimentation to finally build the first successful airplane.

Problem solving consists of using generic or ad hoc methods, in an orderly manner, for finding solutions to problems. Some of the problem-solving techniques developed and used in artificial intelligence , computer science , engineering , mathematics , or medicine are related to mental problem-solving techniques studied in psychology.

Considered the most complex of all intellectual functions, problem solving has been defined as a higher-order cognitive process that requires the modulation and control of more routine or fundamental skills. [4] Problem solving has two major domains: mathematical problem solving and personal problem solving where, in the second, some difficulty or barrier is encountered. [5]

This book will show you what you ‘do’ in order to be creative. Paradoxically creativity flourishes best when a robust process structure is in place, a map to guide you through imagination to action. To navigate the map simple behavioural tools are needed and these are described in detail as well.

We encourage you to use the content you find on this site, in accordance with the Creative Commons license specified here, and on each page:

Click the image above for a description of these terms. For additional permissions (e.g., to license the work for commercial use), e-mail us.

It’s a process that helps you redefine the problems and opportunities you face, come  up with new, innovative responses and solutions, and then take action. The tools and techniques used make the process fun, engaging, and collaborative. CPS not only helps you create better solutions, it creates a positive experience that helps speed the  adoption of new ideas.

If you search the Internet for “Creative Problem Solving,” you’ll find evidence of many variations, all of which may be traced back to the work that was started by Alex Osborn in the 1940s, developed with Sid Parnes in the 1950s, and nurtured at SUNY Buffalo State and the Creative Education Foundation.

Early interest in the creative process examined the natural approaches taken by highly creative people in applying their personal creativity when solving problems (e.g., Crawford, 1937; Dewey, 1910; Ghiselin, 1950; Poincaré, 1924; Spearman, 1931; Wallas, 1926). The effort to make these creative processes more visible, explicit, and deliberate has been one of the most formidable challenges for researchers for many years.

Basadur, M. S., Graen, G. B. & Green, S. G. (1982). Training in creative problem solving: Effects on ideation and problem finding in an industrial research organization. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 30 , 41-70.

Creative ideas do not suddenly appear in people’s minds for no apparent reason. Rather, they are the result of trying to solve a specific problem or to achieve a particular goal. Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity were not sudden inspirations. Rather they were the result of a huge amount of mental problem solving trying to close a discrepancy between the laws of physics and the laws of electromagnetism as they were understood at the time.

Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison and other creative geniuses have always worked in the same way. They do not wait for creative ideas to strike them. Rather they focus on trying to solve a clearly stated, at least in their minds, problem.

Imagine that you're vacuuming your house in a hurry because you've got friends coming over. Frustratingly, you're working hard but you're not getting very far. You kneel down, open up the vacuum cleaner, and pull out the bag. In a cloud of dust, you realize that it's full. again. Coughing, you empty it and wonder why vacuum cleaners with bags still exist!

James Dyson , inventor and founder of Dyson® vacuum cleaners, had exactly the same problem, and he used creative problem solving to find the answer. While many companies focused on developing a better vacuum cleaner filter, he realized that he had to think differently and find a more creative solution. So, he devised a revolutionary way to separate the dirt from the air, and invented the world's first bagless vacuum cleaner.

Click here creative approaches to problem solving

This article explains a wide range of techniques that helps you develop creative solutions to your problems.

We encourage you to use the content you find on this site, in accordance with the Creative Commons license specified here, and on each page:

Click the image above for a description of these terms. For additional permissions (e.g., to license the work for commercial use), e-mail us.

It’s a process that helps you redefine the problems and opportunities you face, come  up with new, innovative responses and solutions, and then take action. The tools and techniques used make the process fun, engaging, and collaborative. CPS not only helps you create better solutions, it creates a positive experience that helps speed the  adoption of new ideas.

If you search the Internet for “Creative Problem Solving,” you’ll find evidence of many variations, all of which may be traced back to the work that was started by Alex Osborn in the 1940s, developed with Sid Parnes in the 1950s, and nurtured at SUNY Buffalo State and the Creative Education Foundation.

Early interest in the creative process examined the natural approaches taken by highly creative people in applying their personal creativity when solving problems (e.g., Crawford, 1937; Dewey, 1910; Ghiselin, 1950; Poincaré, 1924; Spearman, 1931; Wallas, 1926). The effort to make these creative processes more visible, explicit, and deliberate has been one of the most formidable challenges for researchers for many years.

Basadur, M. S., Graen, G. B. & Green, S. G. (1982). Training in creative problem solving: Effects on ideation and problem finding in an industrial research organization. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 30 , 41-70.

Creative ideas do not suddenly appear in people’s minds for no apparent reason. Rather, they are the result of trying to solve a specific problem or to achieve a particular goal. Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity were not sudden inspirations. Rather they were the result of a huge amount of mental problem solving trying to close a discrepancy between the laws of physics and the laws of electromagnetism as they were understood at the time.

Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison and other creative geniuses have always worked in the same way. They do not wait for creative ideas to strike them. Rather they focus on trying to solve a clearly stated, at least in their minds, problem.

We encourage you to use the content you find on this site, in accordance with the Creative Commons license specified here, and on each page:

Click the image above for a description of these terms. For additional permissions (e.g., to license the work for commercial use), e-mail us.

It’s a process that helps you redefine the problems and opportunities you face, come  up with new, innovative responses and solutions, and then take action. The tools and techniques used make the process fun, engaging, and collaborative. CPS not only helps you create better solutions, it creates a positive experience that helps speed the  adoption of new ideas.

If you search the Internet for “Creative Problem Solving,” you’ll find evidence of many variations, all of which may be traced back to the work that was started by Alex Osborn in the 1940s, developed with Sid Parnes in the 1950s, and nurtured at SUNY Buffalo State and the Creative Education Foundation.

Early interest in the creative process examined the natural approaches taken by highly creative people in applying their personal creativity when solving problems (e.g., Crawford, 1937; Dewey, 1910; Ghiselin, 1950; Poincaré, 1924; Spearman, 1931; Wallas, 1926). The effort to make these creative processes more visible, explicit, and deliberate has been one of the most formidable challenges for researchers for many years.

Basadur, M. S., Graen, G. B. & Green, S. G. (1982). Training in creative problem solving: Effects on ideation and problem finding in an industrial research organization. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 30 , 41-70.

Creative ideas do not suddenly appear in people’s minds for no apparent reason. Rather, they are the result of trying to solve a specific problem or to achieve a particular goal. Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity were not sudden inspirations. Rather they were the result of a huge amount of mental problem solving trying to close a discrepancy between the laws of physics and the laws of electromagnetism as they were understood at the time.

Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison and other creative geniuses have always worked in the same way. They do not wait for creative ideas to strike them. Rather they focus on trying to solve a clearly stated, at least in their minds, problem.

Imagine that you''re vacuuming your house in a hurry because you''ve got friends coming over. Frustratingly, you''re working hard but you''re not getting very far. You kneel down, open up the vacuum cleaner, and pull out the bag. In a cloud of dust, you realize that it''s full. again. Coughing, you empty it and wonder why vacuum cleaners with bags still exist!

James Dyson , inventor and founder of Dyson® vacuum cleaners, had exactly the same problem, and he used creative problem solving to find the answer. While many companies focused on developing a better vacuum cleaner filter, he realized that he had to think differently and find a more creative solution. So, he devised a revolutionary way to separate the dirt from the air, and invented the world''s first bagless vacuum cleaner.

Creative problem solving is a technique to approach a problem or address a challenge in an imaginative way; it helps us flex our minds, find path-breaking ideas and take suitable actions thereafter.

While creative problem solving is a structured approach, it gives users the flexibility to use it in innumerable ways for different kinds of situations. One classic example that demonstrates creative problem solving is the story of the Wright Brothers, who despite their several failures, learnt from their mistakes and overcame the challenges of wing shape and warping to make flying possible. They didn’t give up easily; instead they put in a lot of time into studying the problem and experimentation to finally build the first successful airplane.

We encourage you to use the content you find on this site, in accordance with the Creative Commons license specified here, and on each page:

Click the image above for a description of these terms. For additional permissions (e.g., to license the work for commercial use), e-mail us.

It’s a process that helps you redefine the problems and opportunities you face, come  up with new, innovative responses and solutions, and then take action. The tools and techniques used make the process fun, engaging, and collaborative. CPS not only helps you create better solutions, it creates a positive experience that helps speed the  adoption of new ideas.

If you search the Internet for “Creative Problem Solving,” you’ll find evidence of many variations, all of which may be traced back to the work that was started by Alex Osborn in the 1940s, developed with Sid Parnes in the 1950s, and nurtured at SUNY Buffalo State and the Creative Education Foundation.

Early interest in the creative process examined the natural approaches taken by highly creative people in applying their personal creativity when solving problems (e.g., Crawford, 1937; Dewey, 1910; Ghiselin, 1950; Poincaré, 1924; Spearman, 1931; Wallas, 1926). The effort to make these creative processes more visible, explicit, and deliberate has been one of the most formidable challenges for researchers for many years.

Basadur, M. S., Graen, G. B. & Green, S. G. (1982). Training in creative problem solving: Effects on ideation and problem finding in an industrial research organization. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 30 , 41-70.

Creative ideas do not suddenly appear in people’s minds for no apparent reason. Rather, they are the result of trying to solve a specific problem or to achieve a particular goal. Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity were not sudden inspirations. Rather they were the result of a huge amount of mental problem solving trying to close a discrepancy between the laws of physics and the laws of electromagnetism as they were understood at the time.

Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison and other creative geniuses have always worked in the same way. They do not wait for creative ideas to strike them. Rather they focus on trying to solve a clearly stated, at least in their minds, problem.

Imagine that you''''re vacuuming your house in a hurry because you''''ve got friends coming over. Frustratingly, you''''re working hard but you''''re not getting very far. You kneel down, open up the vacuum cleaner, and pull out the bag. In a cloud of dust, you realize that it''''s full. again. Coughing, you empty it and wonder why vacuum cleaners with bags still exist!

James Dyson , inventor and founder of Dyson® vacuum cleaners, had exactly the same problem, and he used creative problem solving to find the answer. While many companies focused on developing a better vacuum cleaner filter, he realized that he had to think differently and find a more creative solution. So, he devised a revolutionary way to separate the dirt from the air, and invented the world''''s first bagless vacuum cleaner.

Creative problem solving is a technique to approach a problem or address a challenge in an imaginative way; it helps us flex our minds, find path-breaking ideas and take suitable actions thereafter.

While creative problem solving is a structured approach, it gives users the flexibility to use it in innumerable ways for different kinds of situations. One classic example that demonstrates creative problem solving is the story of the Wright Brothers, who despite their several failures, learnt from their mistakes and overcame the challenges of wing shape and warping to make flying possible. They didn’t give up easily; instead they put in a lot of time into studying the problem and experimentation to finally build the first successful airplane.

Problem solving consists of using generic or ad hoc methods, in an orderly manner, for finding solutions to problems. Some of the problem-solving techniques developed and used in artificial intelligence , computer science , engineering , mathematics , or medicine are related to mental problem-solving techniques studied in psychology.

Considered the most complex of all intellectual functions, problem solving has been defined as a higher-order cognitive process that requires the modulation and control of more routine or fundamental skills. [4] Problem solving has two major domains: mathematical problem solving and personal problem solving where, in the second, some difficulty or barrier is encountered. [5]