Тема: Do you have any ideas for parent involvement in the classroom?

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child's love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

With these compelling reasons in mind, it is hard to justify not making creative writing an important part of the elementary school classroom day. It is important that the reasons for writing be made clear to administrators and parents, who may automatically categorize creative writing as merely frivolous play, something akin to recess.

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf's point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

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Click here creative writing in the classroom

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

With these compelling reasons in mind, it is hard to justify not making creative writing an important part of the elementary school classroom day. It is important that the reasons for writing be made clear to administrators and parents, who may automatically categorize creative writing as merely frivolous play, something akin to recess.

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

More writing activities! Here are ideas that will kick-start writing with kids. They''''re written for families to do, but will work in the classroom, too:

• Round Robin Stories
• Wacky Headlines
• Invent a World

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Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf''''''''''''''''s point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

More writing activities! Here are ideas that will kick-start writing with kids. They're written for families to do, but will work in the classroom, too:

• Round Robin Stories
• Wacky Headlines
• Invent a World

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''''''''''''''''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf''''''''s point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

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Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''''''''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf''''s point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

It sounds kind of stupid, but a group of juniors did a project like this. They took a binder and wrote "Jew" in it 1 million times to show how much one million really is, representing all the lives lost in the haloucaust. So, you could take a binder and like make a stick figure or something and put it into a binder showing how many people there should be, then surround it by how many there acutally are. P.S. A computer might help :) Just hit "print" a few hundred times :)

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf''s point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

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You are the only person who can answer your question.

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

More writing activities! Here are ideas that will kick-start writing with kids. They''re written for families to do, but will work in the classroom, too:

• Round Robin Stories
• Wacky Headlines
• Invent a World

12

Study Jackie Robinson.He was baseball s first African American (1947). He was a leader in the black community.

Most children enter school with a natural interest in writing, an inherent need to express themselves in words (Graves, 1983). Couple this with a child''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s love of stories and nursery rhymes – who has not seen a goggle-eyed group of kindergartners lost in the world of imagination as their teacher reads them a favorite story or nursery rhyme? – and you have the basis for building an emotionally involving and intellectually stimulating creative writing program for your students. This article should help teachers with that task.

Tompkins (1982) suggests seven reasons why children should write stories (these reasons, of course, also apply to writing poetry):

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children. This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s point of view.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory. Make a list of these on the board for the children to refer to later.

More writing activities! Here are ideas that will kick-start writing with kids. They''''''''re written for families to do, but will work in the classroom, too:

• Round Robin Stories
• Wacky Headlines
• Invent a World