Тема: Eating Disorders In Athletes | Exercise Anorexia Rehab for.

B-eat states that” currently the number of people receiving treatment for anorexia or bulimia to be near 90, 000, while many more people have eating disorders undiagnosed”. So of these 92%, the 17% who felt they might be able to talk to a doctor or nurse. So might benefit from the programme.

If 92 percent of children feel that they could not tell anyone that they had an eating disorder then it is obvious that there is a need for young people to be educated about the dangers of eating disorders. There is also a need for counsellors or something similar to the Samaritans. So that children have the opportunity to talk about eating disorders to people who will not judge them. The will just listen and give advice if it is asked for.

The International Olympic Committee has published recommendations for reducing the risk of the Female Athlete Triad, available at: .

Female athletes with a genetic predisposition to eating disorders may develop them as a result of restricting calories in an attempt to be thin. They may do so in order to please coaches and judges, or because they believe that it allows them a competitive advantage. Comments from coaches pertaining to body weight can potentially cause an athlete to resort to dangerous methods of weight control. Such practices also can cause serious emotional damage to the athlete.

In sports where athletes are judged by technical and artistic merit, they can feel enormous pressure to be thin. Many judges consider thinness to be an important factor when deciding the artistic score. In 1988, at a meet in Budapest, a US judge told Christy Henrich , one of the world’s top gymnasts, that she was too fat and needed to lose weight if she hoped to make the Olympic squad. Christy resorted to anorexia and bulimia as a way to control her weight, and her eating disorders eventually took her life. Christy Henrich died at the age of 22 of multiple organ failure.

Not lastly, some sports emphasize the need for thinness, which is seen as an essential factor in improving performance. This happens in fields such as gymnastics, figure skating or running. Added to the stress that athletic performance involves, and to the usual risk factors and personal family history that may create just the right breeding conditions for these mental diseases, these premises make athletes a group that is highly susceptible to developing eating disorders.

A handicapping factor in the attempt to treat these patients is the fact that athletes believe in the value of being thin as a basis for athletic success. Additionally, the line between being a dedicated athlete and engaging in compulsive exercising is often blurred by the fact that hard work is expected from these high-octane performers. However, the first step in anorexia and bulimia treatment in athletes is to help the patient recognize and acknowledge the problem.

If you can relate to the above saying, you are not alone. It is estimated that 75 million people worldwide suffer from eating disorders, including anorexia and bulimia. While most are women, about 10 to 15 percent are men.

Teenagers and young adults are most likely to have eating disorders, but people of all ages, including young children, can have these conditions. Unfortunately, many suffer in silence, ashamed or embarrassed to seek help, or unaware that help is even out there.

Well it is not anorexia perhaps a bit disordered consuming. It s now not healthful. That s how I had been in recent times. I misplaced 30 a few kilos for the reason that August. I would stand to lose it despite the fact that however it is not the right manner.

i used to be such as you, basically i had to be a well being instructor because of the fact I enjoyed exercising. i became easily quite captivated with exercising because of the fact I easily have an eating affliction, too. (Bulimia). i became continually thinking if it became something I ought to easily do, when you consider that I easily have an eating affliction. yet besides, my advice for you is to easily take it slow and locate out approximately your self. If it is something you sense you elect and would do, then choose for it. yet once you have your doubts, supply your self extra time to parent it out. you do no longer would desire to hurry into issues, and no-one ever mentioned that having an eating affliction capacity you may no longer pursue a profession handling nutrition and well being. of direction, you will would desire to benefit and be recovered (properly, in my opinion you re in no way completely recovered, because of the fact this is a psychological ailment) sufficient to coach others the staggering person-friendly strategies to drop some pounds and get healthful. And as far as helping those with eating subjects, i think of you re able to do a brilliant activity in case you how you may deal including your very own eating affliction. a minimum of you will understand, like a prior answer stated. no you may understand eating subjects completely till they have long previous by using it themselves. So in simple terms loosen up, and if over the years this continues to be something you re into and thinking, than you should choose for it.

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The International Olympic Committee has published recommendations for reducing the risk of the Female Athlete Triad, available at: .

Eating Disorders and Gymnastics. Does your child rave about becoming the next Cathy Rigby, Nadia Comaneci or Kathy Johnson?

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The International Olympic Committee has published recommendations for reducing the risk of the Female Athlete Triad, available at: .

Female athletes with a genetic predisposition to eating disorders may develop them as a result of restricting calories in an attempt to be thin. They may do so in order to please coaches and judges, or because they believe that it allows them a competitive advantage. Comments from coaches pertaining to body weight can potentially cause an athlete to resort to dangerous methods of weight control. Such practices also can cause serious emotional damage to the athlete.

In sports where athletes are judged by technical and artistic merit, they can feel enormous pressure to be thin. Many judges consider thinness to be an important factor when deciding the artistic score. In 1988, at a meet in Budapest, a US judge told Christy Henrich , one of the world’s top gymnasts, that she was too fat and needed to lose weight if she hoped to make the Olympic squad. Christy resorted to anorexia and bulimia as a way to control her weight, and her eating disorders eventually took her life. Christy Henrich died at the age of 22 of multiple organ failure.

Not lastly, some sports emphasize the need for thinness, which is seen as an essential factor in improving performance. This happens in fields such as gymnastics, figure skating or running. Added to the stress that athletic performance involves, and to the usual risk factors and personal family history that may create just the right breeding conditions for these mental diseases, these premises make athletes a group that is highly susceptible to developing eating disorders.

A handicapping factor in the attempt to treat these patients is the fact that athletes believe in the value of being thin as a basis for athletic success. Additionally, the line between being a dedicated athlete and engaging in compulsive exercising is often blurred by the fact that hard work is expected from these high-octane performers. However, the first step in anorexia and bulimia treatment in athletes is to help the patient recognize and acknowledge the problem.

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The International Olympic Committee has published recommendations for reducing the risk of the Female Athlete Triad, available at: .

Female athletes with a genetic predisposition to eating disorders may develop them as a result of restricting calories in an attempt to be thin. They may do so in order to please coaches and judges, or because they believe that it allows them a competitive advantage. Comments from coaches pertaining to body weight can potentially cause an athlete to resort to dangerous methods of weight control. Such practices also can cause serious emotional damage to the athlete.

In sports where athletes are judged by technical and artistic merit, they can feel enormous pressure to be thin. Many judges consider thinness to be an important factor when deciding the artistic score. In 1988, at a meet in Budapest, a US judge told Christy Henrich , one of the world’s top gymnasts, that she was too fat and needed to lose weight if she hoped to make the Olympic squad. Christy resorted to anorexia and bulimia as a way to control her weight, and her eating disorders eventually took her life. Christy Henrich died at the age of 22 of multiple organ failure.

The same as what Stella said.