Тема: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Part 1 - Khan Academy

Critical reading is a technique for discovering information and ideas within a text; critical thinking is a technique for evaluating information and ideas, for.

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Geoff Pynn (Northern Illinois University) gets you started on the critical thinking journey. He tells you what critical thinking is, what an argument is.

With a bare minimum of staff and resources, The Foundation for Critical Thinking needs volunteer help as it serves countless students and faculty at universities, school districts, trade schools, and private and military academies around the world, as well as businesses, government departments, and individuals from all walks of life.

As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, we run on limited funding. We need help from you to keep our organization alive! Help us conclude our Spring Fund Drive successfully with a charitable contribution in support of substantive critical thinking and the advancement of fairminded rational societies.

In the Australian Curriculum, students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they learn to generate and evaluate knowledge, clarify concepts and ideas, seek possibilities, consider alternatives and solve problems. Critical and creative thinking involves students thinking broadly and deeply using skills, behaviours and dispositions such as reason, logic, resourcefulness, imagination and innovation in all learning areas at school and in their lives beyond school.

Thinking that is productive, purposeful and intentional is at the centre of effective learning. By applying a sequence of thinking skills, students develop an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the processes they can use whenever they encounter problems, unfamiliar information and new ideas. In addition, the progressive development of knowledge about thinking and the practice of using thinking strategies can increase students’ motivation for, and management of, their own learning. They become more confident and autonomous problem-solvers and thinkers.

We have over 100 online tutorials on different aspects of thinking skills. They are organized into modules listed below and in the menu above. Our tutorials are used by universities, community colleges, and high schools around the world. The tutorials are completely free and under a Creative Commons license. More info

An Introduction to Critical Thinking and Creativity: Think More, Think Better. (Wiley, 2011). Written by Joe Lau, author of this website. This textbook provides a more detailed treatment of many of the topics here. More details.

Hi! Here s your opponent s step-by-step argument: 1) Everyone who wants to reform our country doesn t like our country. 2) Everybody who doesn t like our country should move to another country. 3) You want to reform our country. 4) You don t like our country. 5) Therefore, you should move to another country. Put in its best light (which is what you must do if you are reasoning intelligently), there is no fallacy. However, the argument fails because the premises are false or unproven. Hence, an argument can contain false premises and still be a valid argument. Of course, all of this assumes your antagonist is making an argument. Commands are not arguments, so if all he is doing is telling you to move someplace else, then there isn t an argument to analyze. However, if your opponent argues: 1) Johnny says the country is bad because it needs reform x. 2) The country isn t bad. 3) Therefore, the country doesn t need reform x. This is a clear example of a straw man. Your opponent is confusing your claim with a less plausible claim you do not make. To say you don t like your country because you favor a particular reform is like saying you don t like your wife because she needs to improve her spaghetti. It is a misrepresentation of your argument. That said, even if the premises of this argument are true, the conclusion does not follow. The fallacy is a red herring because the issue is not whether the whole country is good or bad. A red herring is an introduction of extraneous matter into argument in order to divert attention away from the subject. Reform x stands on its own merit. Kind regards, Scalia

With a bare minimum of staff and resources, The Foundation for Critical Thinking needs volunteer help as it serves countless students and faculty at universities, school districts, trade schools, and private and military academies around the world, as well as businesses, government departments, and individuals from all walks of life.

As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, we run on limited funding. We need help from you to keep our organization alive! Help us conclude our Spring Fund Drive successfully with a charitable contribution in support of substantive critical thinking and the advancement of fairminded rational societies.

In the Australian Curriculum, students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they learn to generate and evaluate knowledge, clarify concepts and ideas, seek possibilities, consider alternatives and solve problems. Critical and creative thinking involves students thinking broadly and deeply using skills, behaviours and dispositions such as reason, logic, resourcefulness, imagination and innovation in all learning areas at school and in their lives beyond school.

Thinking that is productive, purposeful and intentional is at the centre of effective learning. By applying a sequence of thinking skills, students develop an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the processes they can use whenever they encounter problems, unfamiliar information and new ideas. In addition, the progressive development of knowledge about thinking and the practice of using thinking strategies can increase students’ motivation for, and management of, their own learning. They become more confident and autonomous problem-solvers and thinkers.

We have over 100 online tutorials on different aspects of thinking skills. They are organized into modules listed below and in the menu above. Our tutorials are used by universities, community colleges, and high schools around the world. The tutorials are completely free and under a Creative Commons license. More info

An Introduction to Critical Thinking and Creativity: Think More, Think Better. (Wiley, 2011). Written by Joe Lau, author of this website. This textbook provides a more detailed treatment of many of the topics here. More details.

Critical Thinking is the art of using reason to analyze ideas and dig deeper to get to our true potential. Critical thinking isn't about thinking more or thinking harder; it's about thinking better. Honing your critical thinking skills can open up a lifetime of intellectual curiosity. But the journey isn't all rosy. Critical thinking requires a lot of discipline. Staying on track takes a combination of steady growth, motivation, and the ability to take an honest look at yourself, even in the face of some uncomfortable facts.

With a bare minimum of staff and resources, The Foundation for Critical Thinking needs volunteer help as it serves countless students and faculty at universities, school districts, trade schools, and private and military academies around the world, as well as businesses, government departments, and individuals from all walks of life.

As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, we run on limited funding. We need help from you to keep our organization alive! Help us conclude our Spring Fund Drive successfully with a charitable contribution in support of substantive critical thinking and the advancement of fairminded rational societies.

In the Australian Curriculum, students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they learn to generate and evaluate knowledge, clarify concepts and ideas, seek possibilities, consider alternatives and solve problems. Critical and creative thinking involves students thinking broadly and deeply using skills, behaviours and dispositions such as reason, logic, resourcefulness, imagination and innovation in all learning areas at school and in their lives beyond school.

Thinking that is productive, purposeful and intentional is at the centre of effective learning. By applying a sequence of thinking skills, students develop an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the processes they can use whenever they encounter problems, unfamiliar information and new ideas. In addition, the progressive development of knowledge about thinking and the practice of using thinking strategies can increase students’ motivation for, and management of, their own learning. They become more confident and autonomous problem-solvers and thinkers.