Тема: how to solve this math problem? ?

There are numerous approaches to solving math problems. 'Model Drawing' is the first one that we have introduced because we feel that it has the greatest impact in.

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1) Draw a Picture 2) Look for a Pattern 3) Guess and Check

4) Make a Systematic List 5) Logical Reasoning 6) Work Backwards

The problem-solving process can be described as a journey from meeting a problem for the first time to finding a solution, communicating it and evaluating the route. There are many models of the problem-solving process but they all have a similar structure. One model is given below. Although implying a linear process from comprehension through to evaluation, the model is more of a flow backward and forward, revisiting and revising on the problem-solving journey.

Having understood what the problem is about and established what needs finding, this stage is about planning a pathway to the solution. It is within this process that you might encourage pupils to think about whether they have seen something similar before and what strategies they adopted then. This will help them to identify appropriate methods and tools. Particular knowledge and skills gaps that need addressing may become evident at this stage.

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3

1) Draw a Picture 2) Look for a Pattern 3) Guess and Check

4) Make a Systematic List 5) Logical Reasoning 6) Work Backwards

The problem-solving process can be described as a journey from meeting a problem for the first time to finding a solution, communicating it and evaluating the route. There are many models of the problem-solving process but they all have a similar structure. One model is given below. Although implying a linear process from comprehension through to evaluation, the model is more of a flow backward and forward, revisiting and revising on the problem-solving journey.

Having understood what the problem is about and established what needs finding, this stage is about planning a pathway to the solution. It is within this process that you might encourage pupils to think about whether they have seen something similar before and what strategies they adopted then. This will help them to identify appropriate methods and tools. Particular knowledge and skills gaps that need addressing may become evident at this stage.

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One of the practices from the Common Core State Standards that we sought to specifically address in this way, was: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Part of this standard reads as follows:

A possible design strategy was to construct “sample student work” for students to discuss, critique and compare with their own ideas. In this paper we describe the reasons for this approach and the outcomes we have observed when this was used in classroom trials.

These links are to general test-prep sites that provide questions in multiple-choice format that students can answer online.

1) Draw a Picture 2) Look for a Pattern 3) Guess and Check

4) Make a Systematic List 5) Logical Reasoning 6) Work Backwards

The problem-solving process can be described as a journey from meeting a problem for the first time to finding a solution, communicating it and evaluating the route. There are many models of the problem-solving process but they all have a similar structure. One model is given below. Although implying a linear process from comprehension through to evaluation, the model is more of a flow backward and forward, revisiting and revising on the problem-solving journey.

Having understood what the problem is about and established what needs finding, this stage is about planning a pathway to the solution. It is within this process that you might encourage pupils to think about whether they have seen something similar before and what strategies they adopted then. This will help them to identify appropriate methods and tools. Particular knowledge and skills gaps that need addressing may become evident at this stage.

1) Draw a Picture 2) Look for a Pattern 3) Guess and Check

4) Make a Systematic List 5) Logical Reasoning 6) Work Backwards

The problem-solving process can be described as a journey from meeting a problem for the first time to finding a solution, communicating it and evaluating the route. There are many models of the problem-solving process but they all have a similar structure. One model is given below. Although implying a linear process from comprehension through to evaluation, the model is more of a flow backward and forward, revisiting and revising on the problem-solving journey.

Having understood what the problem is about and established what needs finding, this stage is about planning a pathway to the solution. It is within this process that you might encourage pupils to think about whether they have seen something similar before and what strategies they adopted then. This will help them to identify appropriate methods and tools. Particular knowledge and skills gaps that need addressing may become evident at this stage.

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Tweet

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One of the practices from the Common Core State Standards that we sought to specifically address in this way, was: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Part of this standard reads as follows:

A possible design strategy was to construct “sample student work” for students to discuss, critique and compare with their own ideas. In this paper we describe the reasons for this approach and the outcomes we have observed when this was used in classroom trials.

1) Draw a Picture 2) Look for a Pattern 3) Guess and Check

4) Make a Systematic List 5) Logical Reasoning 6) Work Backwards

The problem-solving process can be described as a journey from meeting a problem for the first time to finding a solution, communicating it and evaluating the route. There are many models of the problem-solving process but they all have a similar structure. One model is given below. Although implying a linear process from comprehension through to evaluation, the model is more of a flow backward and forward, revisiting and revising on the problem-solving journey.

Having understood what the problem is about and established what needs finding, this stage is about planning a pathway to the solution. It is within this process that you might encourage pupils to think about whether they have seen something similar before and what strategies they adopted then. This will help them to identify appropriate methods and tools. Particular knowledge and skills gaps that need addressing may become evident at this stage.

Hosted by:

























Tweet

Our Other Sites:


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Custom Search

One of the practices from the Common Core State Standards that we sought to specifically address in this way, was: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Part of this standard reads as follows:

A possible design strategy was to construct “sample student work” for students to discuss, critique and compare with their own ideas. In this paper we describe the reasons for this approach and the outcomes we have observed when this was used in classroom trials.

These links are to general test-prep sites that provide questions in multiple-choice format that students can answer online.

The puppies need to go to sleep but there needs to be an even number of puppies in each of the dog baskets. Can you help the puppies to go to sleep?

This is a challenging maths game where the numbers in each row need to add up to a given total. The examples get progressively harder.

my strategy when solving a math problem is that i underline/highlight the key numbers/info.. then jot them down to the side and find what they re asking for.. some word problems are challenging, but i m sure they re not as hard as i think they are if i just re-read them =p haha.

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Yes. It will occur on Oct 31st. The ghost nightmares occur on April 5th and the cats nightmares occur on April 6th. Since the repetition occurs every 19 and 13 days respectively, with 19 and 13 both being the prime numbers, the entire cycle will be repeated after every 19 X 13 = 247 days. So we need to look at the multiples of 19 and 13 till we reach 247 for each of these. The instance where we encounter a multiple of 13 to be exactly one less than the multiple of 19, we will have the answer. Looking at all the multiples of 19 and 13, the first time we hit the above mentioned condition is as follows - 19 X 11 = 209 13 X 16 = 208 So calculating 209 days from April 5th or 208 days from April 6th, we get Thursday, Oct 31st.