Тема: Need research paper topic idea based on social workers (DCFS type)?

Background: The need for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among combat veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq is a growing concern. PTSD has been associated with reduced cardiac coherence (an indicator of heart rate variability [HRV]) and deficits in early stage information processing (attention and immediate memory) in different studies. However, the co-occurrence of reduced coherence and cognition in combat veterans with PTSD has not been studied before.

Primary Study Objective: A pilot study was undertaken to assess the covariance of coherence and information processing in combat veterans. An additional study goal was assessment of effects of HRV biofeedback (HRVB) on coherence and information processing in these veterans.

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Order essay here research papers on stress

Background: The need for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among combat veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq is a growing concern. PTSD has been associated with reduced cardiac coherence (an indicator of heart rate variability [HRV]) and deficits in early stage information processing (attention and immediate memory) in different studies. However, the co-occurrence of reduced coherence and cognition in combat veterans with PTSD has not been studied before.

Primary Study Objective: A pilot study was undertaken to assess the covariance of coherence and information processing in combat veterans. An additional study goal was assessment of effects of HRV biofeedback (HRVB) on coherence and information processing in these veterans.

Robotic surgery dates back to 1985 when a neurosurgeon used an early model of a surgical robot to successfully perform […]

Early childhood is a stage when children develop basic skills and learn to become self- sufficient (Loehr & Meyers, 2009). […]

This working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child defines the concept of “ toxic stress ”—what happens when children experience severe, prolonged adversity without adult support. It discusses how significant adversity early in life can alter a child’s capacity to learn and adapt to stressful situations, as well as how sensitive and responsive caregiving can buffer the effects of such stress. The paper also suggests how to create policies that minimize the disruptive impacts of toxic stress on young children.

Suggested citation: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2005/2014). Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain: Working Paper No. 3. Updated Edition. Retrieved from

“The difficulty in science is often not so much how to make the discovery but rather to know that one has made it.”  J.D. Bernal

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, A Peer-Reviewed Journal, 2010;16 (4):52-60.
PDF version of the complete paper: Cardiac Coherence and PTSD in Combat Veterans

1 III B.Tech Student, Dept Of Civil Engineering, N.B.K.R IST
2 III B.Tech Student, Dept Of Civil Engineering, N.B.K.R IST

By
G.H V SAI SIMHA 1
1. Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, K L University, Vaddeswaram, Guntur.

This series allows members of the OFR staff and their coauthors to disseminate preliminary research findings in a format intended to generate discussion and critical comments.

Papers in the series are works in progress and subject to revision. Views and opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent official positions or policy of the OFR or Treasury.

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Robotic surgery dates back to 1985 when a neurosurgeon used an early model of a surgical robot to successfully perform […]

Early childhood is a stage when children develop basic skills and learn to become self- sufficient (Loehr & Meyers, 2009). […]

This working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child defines the concept of “ toxic stress ”—what happens when children experience severe, prolonged adversity without adult support. It discusses how significant adversity early in life can alter a child’s capacity to learn and adapt to stressful situations, as well as how sensitive and responsive caregiving can buffer the effects of such stress. The paper also suggests how to create policies that minimize the disruptive impacts of toxic stress on young children.

Suggested citation: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2005/2014). Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain: Working Paper No. 3. Updated Edition. Retrieved from

I can tell you the effect stress & anxiety has on family members. I had to learn the hard way. My daughter, Julie , has been dealing with depression for years, and about 1 year ago she went to a traumatic experience and her whole body shook for a solid two hours. The doctors had no idea what it was. This happened several more times , and then they went into seizures. She now has panic attack, anxiety, depression. She has been in the hospital twice so far within a year, and it it a terrible thing for everyone involved. Julie has trouble being in crowds. She starts having heart palpitations, shaking, and has to leave whereever she is at. Medication has helped , but she still has problems almost every day, but we are all trying to cope with this.

Robotic surgery dates back to 1985 when a neurosurgeon used an early model of a surgical robot to successfully perform […]

Early childhood is a stage when children develop basic skills and learn to become self- sufficient (Loehr & Meyers, 2009). […]

This working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child defines the concept of “ toxic stress ”—what happens when children experience severe, prolonged adversity without adult support. It discusses how significant adversity early in life can alter a child’s capacity to learn and adapt to stressful situations, as well as how sensitive and responsive caregiving can buffer the effects of such stress. The paper also suggests how to create policies that minimize the disruptive impacts of toxic stress on young children.

Suggested citation: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2005/2014). Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain: Working Paper No. 3. Updated Edition. Retrieved from

“The difficulty in science is often not so much how to make the discovery but rather to know that one has made it.”  J.D. Bernal

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, A Peer-Reviewed Journal, 2010;16 (4):52-60.
PDF version of the complete paper: Cardiac Coherence and PTSD in Combat Veterans

1 III B.Tech Student, Dept Of Civil Engineering, N.B.K.R IST
2 III B.Tech Student, Dept Of Civil Engineering, N.B.K.R IST

By
G.H V SAI SIMHA 1
1. Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, K L University, Vaddeswaram, Guntur.

This series allows members of the OFR staff and their coauthors to disseminate preliminary research findings in a format intended to generate discussion and critical comments.

Papers in the series are works in progress and subject to revision. Views and opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent official positions or policy of the OFR or Treasury.

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Here is one excellent paper from which you might derive several ideas from: http://www.scottseverance.us/music/effects_of_music.htm And, you might make mention of the eight learning styles and how music has more impact on people with certain learning styles: http://www.ldrc.ca/projects/miinventory/miinventory.php?eightstyles=1 And, mention of the 16 personality types and that music impacts on people differently based upon personality type, too: http://www.personalitypage.com/high-level.html And, mention of the effects of music on other lifeforms: http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/2000-09/969931680.Zo.r.html My favorite, the Mozart Effect: http://www.indiana.edu/~intell/mozarteffect2.shtml And, this might be useful: http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/music.html Maybe: http://www.2knowmyself.com/Music_therapy/changing_your_mood_using_music_stress And, at your library, request this article: Physical Effects and Motor Responses to Music Elliott Dainow Journal of Research in Music Education, Vol. 25, No. 3 (Autumn, 1977), pp. 211-221 doi:10.2307/3345305

Research Studies. Berceli D, Salmon M, Bonifas R, Ndefo N. Effects of self-induced unclassified tremors on quality of life among non-professional caregivers: A pilot.

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Robotic surgery dates back to 1985 when a neurosurgeon used an early model of a surgical robot to successfully perform […]

Early childhood is a stage when children develop basic skills and learn to become self- sufficient (Loehr & Meyers, 2009). […]

This working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child defines the concept of “ toxic stress ”—what happens when children experience severe, prolonged adversity without adult support. It discusses how significant adversity early in life can alter a child’s capacity to learn and adapt to stressful situations, as well as how sensitive and responsive caregiving can buffer the effects of such stress. The paper also suggests how to create policies that minimize the disruptive impacts of toxic stress on young children.

Suggested citation: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2005/2014). Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain: Working Paper No. 3. Updated Edition. Retrieved from

“The difficulty in science is often not so much how to make the discovery but rather to know that one has made it.”  J.D. Bernal

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, A Peer-Reviewed Journal, 2010;16 (4):52-60.
PDF version of the complete paper: Cardiac Coherence and PTSD in Combat Veterans

Robotic surgery dates back to 1985 when a neurosurgeon used an early model of a surgical robot to successfully perform […]

Early childhood is a stage when children develop basic skills and learn to become self- sufficient (Loehr & Meyers, 2009). […]

This working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child defines the concept of “ toxic stress ”—what happens when children experience severe, prolonged adversity without adult support. It discusses how significant adversity early in life can alter a child’s capacity to learn and adapt to stressful situations, as well as how sensitive and responsive caregiving can buffer the effects of such stress. The paper also suggests how to create policies that minimize the disruptive impacts of toxic stress on young children.

Suggested citation: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2005/2014). Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain: Working Paper No. 3. Updated Edition. Retrieved from

“The difficulty in science is often not so much how to make the discovery but rather to know that one has made it.”  J.D. Bernal

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, A Peer-Reviewed Journal, 2010;16 (4):52-60.
PDF version of the complete paper: Cardiac Coherence and PTSD in Combat Veterans

1 III B.Tech Student, Dept Of Civil Engineering, N.B.K.R IST
2 III B.Tech Student, Dept Of Civil Engineering, N.B.K.R IST

By
G.H V SAI SIMHA 1
1. Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, K L University, Vaddeswaram, Guntur.