Тема: The National Archives Podcast Series

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT PROPOSAL GUIDELINES Important note about writing a proposal: Proposals are informative and persuasive writing because they attempt to.

I agree with all of them

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I had never heard of the term essay prospectus but after researching I found a list of what should be included. An academic research proposal or prospectus is expected to contain these elements: * A rationale for the choice of topic, showing why it is important or useful within the concerns of the discipline in which you are writing. It is sensible also to indicate the limitations of your aims. In other words, don t promise what you can t possibly deliver. * A review of existing published work ("the literature") that relates to a topic. Here you need to tell how your proposed work will build on existing studies and yet explore new territory. * An outline of your intended approach or methodology (with comparisons to existing published work), perhaps including costs, resources needed, and a timeline of when you hope to get things done Particular disciplines have different ways of organizing a research proposal or prospectus. As such, it is wise to ask within your department what the standard guidelines are in organizing your research proposal/prospectus. Research proposals/prospectuses are often longer than abstracts (up to 500 words). Often it is helpful to begin with a research question that you would like to investigate/attempt to answer. Other general tips in putting together a research proposal/prospectus include: * Start with why your idea is worth doing (its contribution to the field), then fill in how you will address your idea (the technicalities about the topic and method). * Give enough detail to establish the feasibility of your proposal, but not so much as to bore your reader. * Show your ability to deal with possible problems or changes in focus (which will often happen in a longer research project or thesis/dissertation). * ***Show confidence and eagerness by using the first person "I," as well as using active verbs, concise style and positive phrasing. Some other tips to get you started * Look closely at departmental specifications (about timing, scope, length, readers, etc.). Remember, standards for abstracts, research proposals (plans) or prospectuses vary widely from discipline to discipline, journal to journal, conference to conference, and rhetorical situation to rhetorical situation. * Ask other students (undergraduate as well as graduate) in your department about their experiences with this type of writing; look at past abstracts, research proposals (plans) and prospectuses for examples. * Try out your ideas with as wide an audience as possible, especially with your supervisor and/or committee members (informal discussions, drafts, preliminary meetings, presentations at colloquia, etc.). Or, of course, use the services of the Writing Center as an additional audience! * ***Show why your research idea is interesting within your research field by discussion of what other scholars/writers have done and not done with your topic in your field. * ***Show that you can carry out your project by sketching your methodology. * Limit your promises/scope: exclude topics and methods that you will not address and outline those that you will use. * Gain your reader’s interest early by using active language and enthusiasm in your topic! * Don’t confuse verb tenses: use present tense to describe results with continuing applicability or conclusions drawn; use the past tense to describe specific variables manipulated or tests applied; and future tense to project research and predict findings. Avoid “boilerplate sentences” which take up room and provide no real information (ex: “Policy implications are discussed” or “It is concluded that,” etc.). * Always use full sentences and avoid negatives like "can not," "never," etc. Avoid abbreviations, jargon, symbols and other language shortcuts that might lead to confusion. * Above all, DON’T PROCRASTINATE!!! Delay just isolates you and drains your energies. http://writingcenter.unlv.edu/writing/abstract.html is where I got this from.check with your teacher/professor to see if this is what they want. (Personally I feel that your teacher should have provided you with this information.it is part of good teaching to make all expectations of students crystal clear. G

You may be asked to write a proposal that includes all of these sections. Particularly at undergraduate level, your proposal may focus on three or four of the following sections. This is the general order that proposals follow, however you should refer to any specific guidelines on structure from your lecturer or supervisor.

An abstract for a proposal should include the topic, aims of your study, who will be involved in the research, the methods and the timeframe. It is usually concluded with a statement that explains the relevance of the research (why it is needed). Abstracts for proposals are generally in the future tense (you outline what you intend to do). For more information on writing abstracts see abstract.

The exact format and requirements for a research proposal can vary slightly depending on the type of research being proposed and the specific demands of the institution you plan to submit your proposal to, but there are a few basics that are almost always needed. Overall, a good research proposal takes time to write and must identify what the proposed research will address and why the proposed research is so important. Here is a brief explanation of the sections needed to complete a standard research proposal as well as the writing timeline you should strive to follow.

Self-Directed Learning – a process in which individuals take the initiative, with or without the help of others, in diagnosing their learning needs, formulating learning goals, identifying human and material resources for learning, choosing and implementing appropriate learning strategies, and evaluating learning outcomes.

Self-Directed Learning Readiness – the degree to which one perceives oneself to possess the attitudes and skills needed to be an effective self-directed learner. It is measured in the proposed study through the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS), developed by Guglielmino (1977).

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You may be asked to write a proposal that includes all of these sections. Particularly at undergraduate level, your proposal may focus on three or four of the following sections. This is the general order that proposals follow, however you should refer to any specific guidelines on structure from your lecturer or supervisor.

An abstract for a proposal should include the topic, aims of your study, who will be involved in the research, the methods and the timeframe. It is usually concluded with a statement that explains the relevance of the research (why it is needed). Abstracts for proposals are generally in the future tense (you outline what you intend to do). For more information on writing abstracts see abstract.

The exact format and requirements for a research proposal can vary slightly depending on the type of research being proposed and the specific demands of the institution you plan to submit your proposal to, but there are a few basics that are almost always needed. Overall, a good research proposal takes time to write and must identify what the proposed research will address and why the proposed research is so important. Here is a brief explanation of the sections needed to complete a standard research proposal as well as the writing timeline you should strive to follow.

You may be asked to write a proposal that includes all of these sections. Particularly at undergraduate level, your proposal may focus on three or four of the following sections. This is the general order that proposals follow, however you should refer to any specific guidelines on structure from your lecturer or supervisor.

An abstract for a proposal should include the topic, aims of your study, who will be involved in the research, the methods and the timeframe. It is usually concluded with a statement that explains the relevance of the research (why it is needed). Abstracts for proposals are generally in the future tense (you outline what you intend to do). For more information on writing abstracts see abstract.

The exact format and requirements for a research proposal can vary slightly depending on the type of research being proposed and the specific demands of the institution you plan to submit your proposal to, but there are a few basics that are almost always needed. Overall, a good research proposal takes time to write and must identify what the proposed research will address and why the proposed research is so important. Here is a brief explanation of the sections needed to complete a standard research proposal as well as the writing timeline you should strive to follow.

Self-Directed Learning – a process in which individuals take the initiative, with or without the help of others, in diagnosing their learning needs, formulating learning goals, identifying human and material resources for learning, choosing and implementing appropriate learning strategies, and evaluating learning outcomes.

Self-Directed Learning Readiness – the degree to which one perceives oneself to possess the attitudes and skills needed to be an effective self-directed learner. It is measured in the proposed study through the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS), developed by Guglielmino (1977).

After completing this session, your team will be able to: •Develop a project plan (work plan/timeline) to guide the implementation and monitoring of your IR project

Click here research proposal timeline example

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT PROPOSAL GUIDELINES Important note about writing a proposal: Proposals are informative and persuasive writing because they attempt to.