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Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He's an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America''s most cherished folktales – Washington Irving''s Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson''s ghost and Rip''s lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region''s unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

The result of all these researches was a history of the province during the reign of the Dutch governors, which he published some years since. There have been various opinions as to the literary character of his work, and, to tell the truth, it is not a whit better than it should be. Its chief merit is its scrupulous accuracy, which indeed was a little questioned on its first appearance, but has since been completely established; and it is now admitted into all historical collections, as a book of unquestionable authority.

His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits, with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother's heels, equipped in a pair of his father's cast-off galligaskins, which he had much ado to hold up with one hand, as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s most cherished folktales – Washington Irving''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s ghost and Rip''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

The result of all these researches was a history of the province during the reign of the Dutch governors, which he published some years since. There have been various opinions as to the literary character of his work, and, to tell the truth, it is not a whit better than it should be. Its chief merit is its scrupulous accuracy, which indeed was a little questioned on its first appearance, but has since been completely established; and it is now admitted into all historical collections, as a book of unquestionable authority.

His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits, with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s heels, equipped in a pair of his father''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s cast-off galligaskins, which he had much ado to hold up with one hand, as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.

The story of Rip Van Winkle was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker, an old gentleman from New York who was especially interested in the histories, customs, and culture of the Dutch settlers in that state. It is set in a small, very old village at the foot of the Catskill Mountains, which was founded by some of the earliest Dutch settlers. Rip lived there while America was still a colony of Great Britain.

Indeed, when he tries to console himself and escape from Dame Van Winkle, he often goes to a sort of philosophical or political club that meets on a bench outside of a small inn. Here the more idle men actually gossip and tell sleepy stories about nothing, every once in a while discussing “current” events when they find an old newspaper. Nicholaus Vedder is the landlord of the inn and the leader of the group. He never speaks but makes his opinions clear based on how he smokes his pipe. Even here, Van Winkle cannot escape from his wife, who berates everyone for encouraging his idleness.

He woke up at the same place, but he noticed that his bones were aching, and he had grown a gray beard. When Rip returned home, he had found that his house was destroyed, and the village had changed altogether. Nobody could recognize him; he did not see a single familiar face either. He said a couple of names to the villagers, but they appeared to be long dead. When he mentioned his own name and told his story, a woman from the crowd realized that it was her father, who left the house twenty years ago. As it turned out, the cup, from which he had the drink, was the cup of oblivion.

In his story, Irving combines fantasy and reality. This enchanted dream can be reinterpreted as a deliberate lie to justify his long absence. It could be that Rip, enslaved by his wife and tired of continuous welding, just ran away from home. Another point that proves this assumption is that the first question he asked was whether his wife was still alive. Only when he made sure she had passed away, did he tell his name and reveal himself.

FreeBookNotes found 5 sites with book summaries or analysis of Rip Van Winkle. If there is a Rip Van Winkle SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below.

Among the summaries and analysis available for Rip Van Winkle , there are 1 Full Study Guide, 3 Book Reviews and 1 Other Resource.

Depending on the study guide provider (SparkNotes, Shmoop, etc.), the resources below will generally offer Rip Van Winkle chapter summaries, quotes, and analysis of themes, characters, and symbols.

'Rip Van Winkle' by Washington Irving A story revealing the attitudes of Americans at the time of the Revolutionary War

Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving (1783-1859) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rip_Van_Winkle http://www.wisegeek.com/who-is-rip-van-winkle.htm http://www.gradesaver.com/rip-van-winkle/study-guide/ http://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/Guides3/Winkle.html

Click here rip van winkle essay

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

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Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''''''''''''''''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America''''''''s most cherished folktales – Washington Irving''''''''s Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson''''''''s ghost and Rip''''''''s lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region''''''''s unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

The result of all these researches was a history of the province during the reign of the Dutch governors, which he published some years since. There have been various opinions as to the literary character of his work, and, to tell the truth, it is not a whit better than it should be. Its chief merit is its scrupulous accuracy, which indeed was a little questioned on its first appearance, but has since been completely established; and it is now admitted into all historical collections, as a book of unquestionable authority.

His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits, with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother''''s heels, equipped in a pair of his father''''s cast-off galligaskins, which he had much ado to hold up with one hand, as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.

The story of Rip Van Winkle was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker, an old gentleman from New York who was especially interested in the histories, customs, and culture of the Dutch settlers in that state. It is set in a small, very old village at the foot of the Catskill Mountains, which was founded by some of the earliest Dutch settlers. Rip lived there while America was still a colony of Great Britain.

Indeed, when he tries to console himself and escape from Dame Van Winkle, he often goes to a sort of philosophical or political club that meets on a bench outside of a small inn. Here the more idle men actually gossip and tell sleepy stories about nothing, every once in a while discussing “current” events when they find an old newspaper. Nicholaus Vedder is the landlord of the inn and the leader of the group. He never speaks but makes his opinions clear based on how he smokes his pipe. Even here, Van Winkle cannot escape from his wife, who berates everyone for encouraging his idleness.

He woke up at the same place, but he noticed that his bones were aching, and he had grown a gray beard. When Rip returned home, he had found that his house was destroyed, and the village had changed altogether. Nobody could recognize him; he did not see a single familiar face either. He said a couple of names to the villagers, but they appeared to be long dead. When he mentioned his own name and told his story, a woman from the crowd realized that it was her father, who left the house twenty years ago. As it turned out, the cup, from which he had the drink, was the cup of oblivion.

In his story, Irving combines fantasy and reality. This enchanted dream can be reinterpreted as a deliberate lie to justify his long absence. It could be that Rip, enslaved by his wife and tired of continuous welding, just ran away from home. Another point that proves this assumption is that the first question he asked was whether his wife was still alive. Only when he made sure she had passed away, did he tell his name and reveal himself.

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America's most cherished folktales – Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson's ghost and Rip's lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region's unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

Rip Van Winkle Study Guide

10

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s most cherished folktales – Washington Irving''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s ghost and Rip''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

The result of all these researches was a history of the province during the reign of the Dutch governors, which he published some years since. There have been various opinions as to the literary character of his work, and, to tell the truth, it is not a whit better than it should be. Its chief merit is its scrupulous accuracy, which indeed was a little questioned on its first appearance, but has since been completely established; and it is now admitted into all historical collections, as a book of unquestionable authority.

His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits, with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s heels, equipped in a pair of his father''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s cast-off galligaskins, which he had much ado to hold up with one hand, as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.

The story of Rip Van Winkle was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker, an old gentleman from New York who was especially interested in the histories, customs, and culture of the Dutch settlers in that state. It is set in a small, very old village at the foot of the Catskill Mountains, which was founded by some of the earliest Dutch settlers. Rip lived there while America was still a colony of Great Britain.

Indeed, when he tries to console himself and escape from Dame Van Winkle, he often goes to a sort of philosophical or political club that meets on a bench outside of a small inn. Here the more idle men actually gossip and tell sleepy stories about nothing, every once in a while discussing “current” events when they find an old newspaper. Nicholaus Vedder is the landlord of the inn and the leader of the group. He never speaks but makes his opinions clear based on how he smokes his pipe. Even here, Van Winkle cannot escape from his wife, who berates everyone for encouraging his idleness.

He woke up at the same place, but he noticed that his bones were aching, and he had grown a gray beard. When Rip returned home, he had found that his house was destroyed, and the village had changed altogether. Nobody could recognize him; he did not see a single familiar face either. He said a couple of names to the villagers, but they appeared to be long dead. When he mentioned his own name and told his story, a woman from the crowd realized that it was her father, who left the house twenty years ago. As it turned out, the cup, from which he had the drink, was the cup of oblivion.

In his story, Irving combines fantasy and reality. This enchanted dream can be reinterpreted as a deliberate lie to justify his long absence. It could be that Rip, enslaved by his wife and tired of continuous welding, just ran away from home. Another point that proves this assumption is that the first question he asked was whether his wife was still alive. Only when he made sure she had passed away, did he tell his name and reveal himself.

FreeBookNotes found 5 sites with book summaries or analysis of Rip Van Winkle. If there is a Rip Van Winkle SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below.

Among the summaries and analysis available for Rip Van Winkle , there are 1 Full Study Guide, 3 Book Reviews and 1 Other Resource.

Depending on the study guide provider (SparkNotes, Shmoop, etc.), the resources below will generally offer Rip Van Winkle chapter summaries, quotes, and analysis of themes, characters, and symbols.


'Rip Van Winkle' by Washington Irving
A story revealing the attitudes of Americans at the time of the Revolutionary War

Scroll down for the discussion questions, vocabulary, the compete text, and a handout describing the features of American Romantic Literature.




    American Romanticism (PDF 8 KB)
    The common attributes of American Romantic Literature

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''''''''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America''''s most cherished folktales – Washington Irving''''s Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson''''s ghost and Rip''''s lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region''''s unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

The result of all these researches was a history of the province during the reign of the Dutch governors, which he published some years since. There have been various opinions as to the literary character of his work, and, to tell the truth, it is not a whit better than it should be. Its chief merit is its scrupulous accuracy, which indeed was a little questioned on its first appearance, but has since been completely established; and it is now admitted into all historical collections, as a book of unquestionable authority.

His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits, with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother''s heels, equipped in a pair of his father''s cast-off galligaskins, which he had much ado to hold up with one hand, as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.

The story of Rip Van Winkle was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker, an old gentleman from New York who was especially interested in the histories, customs, and culture of the Dutch settlers in that state. It is set in a small, very old village at the foot of the Catskill Mountains, which was founded by some of the earliest Dutch settlers. Rip lived there while America was still a colony of Great Britain.

Indeed, when he tries to console himself and escape from Dame Van Winkle, he often goes to a sort of philosophical or political club that meets on a bench outside of a small inn. Here the more idle men actually gossip and tell sleepy stories about nothing, every once in a while discussing “current” events when they find an old newspaper. Nicholaus Vedder is the landlord of the inn and the leader of the group. He never speaks but makes his opinions clear based on how he smokes his pipe. Even here, Van Winkle cannot escape from his wife, who berates everyone for encouraging his idleness.

12

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s most cherished folktales – Washington Irving''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s ghost and Rip''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

The result of all these researches was a history of the province during the reign of the Dutch governors, which he published some years since. There have been various opinions as to the literary character of his work, and, to tell the truth, it is not a whit better than it should be. Its chief merit is its scrupulous accuracy, which indeed was a little questioned on its first appearance, but has since been completely established; and it is now admitted into all historical collections, as a book of unquestionable authority.

His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits, with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother''''''''''''''''s heels, equipped in a pair of his father''''''''''''''''s cast-off galligaskins, which he had much ado to hold up with one hand, as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.

The story of Rip Van Winkle was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker, an old gentleman from New York who was especially interested in the histories, customs, and culture of the Dutch settlers in that state. It is set in a small, very old village at the foot of the Catskill Mountains, which was founded by some of the earliest Dutch settlers. Rip lived there while America was still a colony of Great Britain.

Indeed, when he tries to console himself and escape from Dame Van Winkle, he often goes to a sort of philosophical or political club that meets on a bench outside of a small inn. Here the more idle men actually gossip and tell sleepy stories about nothing, every once in a while discussing “current” events when they find an old newspaper. Nicholaus Vedder is the landlord of the inn and the leader of the group. He never speaks but makes his opinions clear based on how he smokes his pipe. Even here, Van Winkle cannot escape from his wife, who berates everyone for encouraging his idleness.

He woke up at the same place, but he noticed that his bones were aching, and he had grown a gray beard. When Rip returned home, he had found that his house was destroyed, and the village had changed altogether. Nobody could recognize him; he did not see a single familiar face either. He said a couple of names to the villagers, but they appeared to be long dead. When he mentioned his own name and told his story, a woman from the crowd realized that it was her father, who left the house twenty years ago. As it turned out, the cup, from which he had the drink, was the cup of oblivion.

In his story, Irving combines fantasy and reality. This enchanted dream can be reinterpreted as a deliberate lie to justify his long absence. It could be that Rip, enslaved by his wife and tired of continuous welding, just ran away from home. Another point that proves this assumption is that the first question he asked was whether his wife was still alive. Only when he made sure she had passed away, did he tell his name and reveal himself.

13

Rip Van Winkle lives in a village in the Catskills with his wife and children. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s an easygoing man with a nagging wife who constantly criticizes him. One day, Rip goes for hunting in the mountains and meets Henry Hudson, the famed explorer who discovered the Hudson River. Rip eats and drinks with Hudson and his crew, then falls asleep under a tree.

“Rip Van Winkle” is an American masterpiece of the short story. It is based on local history but is rooted in European myth and legend. Irving reportedly wrote it one night in England, in June, 1818, after having spent the whole day talking with relatives about the happy times spent in Sleepy Hollow. The author drew on his memories and experiences of the Hudson River Valley and blended them with Old World contributions.

One day, a man, harried by the nagging of his wife, wandered into the Catskills near his home. The adventure that follows is one of America''''''''''''''''s most cherished folktales – Washington Irving''''''''''''''''s Rip Van Winkle. For nearly two centuries, the myth of Henry Hudson''''''''''''''''s ghost and Rip''''''''''''''''s lengthy slumber have endured, adding to the delightful enchantment the Great Northern Catskills hold for many contemporary visitors.

Rip is one of the Great Northern Catskills best-loved figureheads – a link to the past, as well as a present reminder of the region''''''''''''''''s unique place in American history. His tale goes something like this:

The result of all these researches was a history of the province during the reign of the Dutch governors, which he published some years since. There have been various opinions as to the literary character of his work, and, to tell the truth, it is not a whit better than it should be. Its chief merit is its scrupulous accuracy, which indeed was a little questioned on its first appearance, but has since been completely established; and it is now admitted into all historical collections, as a book of unquestionable authority.

His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits, with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother''''''''s heels, equipped in a pair of his father''''''''s cast-off galligaskins, which he had much ado to hold up with one hand, as a fine lady does her train in bad weather.

The story of Rip Van Winkle was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker, an old gentleman from New York who was especially interested in the histories, customs, and culture of the Dutch settlers in that state. It is set in a small, very old village at the foot of the Catskill Mountains, which was founded by some of the earliest Dutch settlers. Rip lived there while America was still a colony of Great Britain.

Indeed, when he tries to console himself and escape from Dame Van Winkle, he often goes to a sort of philosophical or political club that meets on a bench outside of a small inn. Here the more idle men actually gossip and tell sleepy stories about nothing, every once in a while discussing “current” events when they find an old newspaper. Nicholaus Vedder is the landlord of the inn and the leader of the group. He never speaks but makes his opinions clear based on how he smokes his pipe. Even here, Van Winkle cannot escape from his wife, who berates everyone for encouraging his idleness.

He woke up at the same place, but he noticed that his bones were aching, and he had grown a gray beard. When Rip returned home, he had found that his house was destroyed, and the village had changed altogether. Nobody could recognize him; he did not see a single familiar face either. He said a couple of names to the villagers, but they appeared to be long dead. When he mentioned his own name and told his story, a woman from the crowd realized that it was her father, who left the house twenty years ago. As it turned out, the cup, from which he had the drink, was the cup of oblivion.

In his story, Irving combines fantasy and reality. This enchanted dream can be reinterpreted as a deliberate lie to justify his long absence. It could be that Rip, enslaved by his wife and tired of continuous welding, just ran away from home. Another point that proves this assumption is that the first question he asked was whether his wife was still alive. Only when he made sure she had passed away, did he tell his name and reveal himself.